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iLead

iLead by Chris Guerriero

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Listen, Learn and Connect with Successful Entrepreneurs and CEO's

iLead BookFrom job-seeking students who want to pay someone to write my essay to ambitious corporate executives, the hunger to stand out from the crowd is within all of us. Those who have the foresight to position themselves as leaders are always seen as “lucky” or “gifted,” when the reality is there are millions of others who are far more worthy, yet lack a single necessary skill.

Being seen as a leader in your field is the cornerstone of true success for companies and individuals who want to grow larger than their current stature in life.

Click here to get your copy today!

In iLead you learned a step-by-step plan which today’s most successful individuals—ranging from CEO’s, to politicians, to today’s new i-millionaires—have used to position themselves as leaders and attain a level of success far beyond their counterparts.

Implementing the systems Chris Guerriero unveiled in iLead is the difference between making marginal profits… and true wealth.  Between middle-of-the pack… and becoming a market leader.

Below is the Peer-to-Peer iLead Forum, where CEO's, successful entrepreneurs, and other readers can share how they used the tactics in iLead to drive revenue, grow brands, and give more to their customers.

Use the box below to share the biggest take-away YOU got from the book and how you used it in your business, then read a few of the other posts to see how other executives are using what they learned.

Jump in, connect and learn now…

Add a Comment


  1. Julie Henry  

    I love what you have to say about minimizing links to additional information "above the fold" on the sales page of a website.  By the time someone has reached the sales page, they should already be pre-sold.  Like you said—let them buy. Amen to that!

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  2. Steve Lindsay  

    I own a veterinary practice in a large town and I want to increase my revenue.  After reading iLead, I decided to experiment with some super-simple cross-promoting by partnering with three pet shops in town.  I had my administrative person set up a contest for some of our services in each of the three stores.  We selected three winners then sent email with a coupon from us and from each store to each entrant. That's all we did.  It cost us next to nothing and a month later, we had 65 new customers. (The month prior I had no new customers.)  Wow!

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  3. Morton P.  

    I own a mortgage brokerage firm.  I took the sensible advice of iLead to theme our advertising with current events related to our industry. Of course, timing is everything. Riding the tide of the news cycle and then lending our expertise to news developments increases our credibility, which feeds right into reputation management.  More and more of our clients are responding to our web presence all the time, so I'm convinced that this strategy is rock solid.

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  4. Todd Richards  

    I have been focusing on Chaper 7 of iLead which discusses concepts surrounding creation of a persuasive online presence.  I have to say that the advice on "the five simple rules to follow" when building a web site has really made a difference in our conversion rate.  By the way, as suggested, I DID hand the list of simple rules to my web designer and he learned a thing or two as well.

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    • Jason McDonald  

      I've been doing web design for ten years, so I've supported a business or two with my work.  At this point, 80 percent of my business comes from repeat customers and referrals, so I've been doing something right.  Having said that, after reading iLead, it's clear to me that there are things I can do to better showcase the businesses of my clients—and best of all—with less time and cost to me!  I will refer to iLead often!!

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  5. Lydia Jones  

    OK, I'm not a CEO like many of your clients seem to be but I've been considering starting a small business in the fashion industry but I'm intimidated by the challenges of marketing.  When I read the part about "Understanding the psychology of your customer allows you to help them reach their goals faster, and it creates a bond between you and them", I really started thinking about marketing as being less intimidating and more one-on-one (if that makes sense?).  Thanks, and I look forward to learning more from iLead.

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  6. Miss Matteson  

    It's not everyday that you hear a concept like credibility over marketing. This is a shift in leadership focus that maybe more businesses should try.

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  7. Kaylee Adams  

    I like how the book points towards leadership as being a position where you lead every aspect of an operation. Too many businesses it seems want a manager for this, that and other thing. The more streamlined a business is in this regard, the more successful it can become in my opinion. 

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    • justin moore  

      The continuous theme of "leadership" throughout iLead really resonates with me.  Five years ago, I started a business focused on selling high quality pet foods, and now I own 15 stores located throughout my region.  I had a vision I believed in, and social media really helped us to communicate it.  I'm confident the principles presented in iLead will help us take things to the next level. I highly recommend it to anyone just starting out or any business who can handle this kind of rapid growth.

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  8. Mason Killan  

    When it comes to handling the public relations and creating buzz, is it better if a company has a dedicated department for PR or is hiring a PR firm sufficient?  I currently have two staff members that assist with social media and community facilitation but no one dedicated to getting publicity.

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    • Chris Guerriero  

      Great question Mason. It's easiest to either handle your PR in house which, done right, might require 10 hours a week (unless you're doing something big like introducing a new product to the market)… or vendor your PR projects off.

      Hiring a full PR firm is to costliest way to handle your PR, and unless you're with one of the big 3, the results you get are going to be marginal.

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    • Cole Turner  

      It would depend on the size of the company and how badly they need the publicity I think. Smaller companies, if they want to really grow, would need people within the company dedicated to that task. 

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      • Harmon Smythe  

        I tend to agree with you.  I think the decision about how to staff a company's PR function has a lot to do with the PR venues being targeted.  As Chris has demonstrated in iLead, modern media technologies, if employed really intelligently, make getting the word out far and wide easy, and more importantly, effectively.

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  9. Olivia - Matruska Design  

    You say, "Leaders use weaknesses as a hook for all their marketing."  What if the weakness isn't well known?  I've always thought it could make us easy targets for the competition.  Chris makes a lot of sense, but I must admit, this marketing strategy does make me nervous in the fashion industry.  

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    • Cynthia Shaman  

      The weakness doesn't necessarily have to be true. For instance, a "going out of business sale" doesn't have to mean the company really is going out of business. The weakness is a perception planted in the minds of consumers.

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      • Chris Guerriero  

        You're right BUT, a leader uses the truth in their marketing. The tactics in iLead will help you grow your company, your online presence, and your reputation (or the reputation of your company). When that happens your website will get A LOT MORE traffic, your business will have A LOT MORE customers walking through the doors, and your phone lines will light up.  If you use lies in your marketing – it will cost you far more in the long run.

        We work with a handful of politicians, helping them to go from someone who may have been ‘unknown’ a year ago, to someone who’s a local or national ‘household name’. These clients are a great example of what happens after your campaign is done. So if you lie about a ‘going out of business sale’ and you do not go out of business, then it will cost you more to run your next campaign because less people will trust you and therefore you’ll need to spend more and more ad dollars on convincing people in your current offer.

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        • Renny McBride  

          As the head of my company, I take the role of leadership very seriously. I view everything that reflects upon the company as reflecting ultimately on our values. We have to be as good as our word if not better. Thanks for stressing the importance of truth in marketing as central to what leaders are all about.

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  10. Lee S  

    I was taught to always give a reason why I was making an offer, but I didn't realize that this could spill over to the rest of my products.  Of course, I haven't been nearly as diligent at cross-promoting my other products which is a mistake I plan on rectifying as fast as possible.

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  11. W Magnum  

    The case study you showed with the supplement company that used advertising to promote their free book showed me that my company is approaching things from the wrong end.  We've been promoting several free reports, but never in our advertising – only on our existing pages.  We're not reaching new customers that way.  I'll be instituting a new ad campaign by the end of the week, using this strategy.

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    • Chris Guerriero  

      you're going to love the results you get – just follow the plan outlined in the book and keep us up to date on your results.

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  12. Jason Draper  

    It took me a while to get a good balance between keeping an active connection with our extensive database of customers, and overwhelming them with contact that made them unsubscribe. The section on 'Touching your list' has solid advice for getting it right as soon as possible. Now I'm looking into compiling various lists so we can send more emails to those who prefer that.

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  13. BarneyII  

    Many years ago I paid for a few business coaching sessions and was advised to make a short film promoting my up and coming company. (This was the days before Internet videos even existed.) I spent a lot of money making it but never felt it was cost effective. Take the advice in chapter 7 and do it yourself! People really do want to connect, and like Chris says, you don't need fancy production crews for that.

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    • Chris Guerriero  

      That's great! Use what you already have first.

      Or get a software program called Camtasia (http://techsmith.com/download/camtasia), or any other user-friendly video editing software like: camstudio, ezvid, jing, windows movie maker, or wax (most of which are free).  Then edit your current video, chopping it up into short clips of no less than 30 seconds and no more than 3 minutes (videos we use to drive traffic to our websites or build a presence on other websites other than ours convert best when kept between those time frame).

      After you edit your video into short clips – put a ‘stinger slide’ at the front and on the back of each video.  A stinger slide is simple an image or a PowerPoint slide that entices people to want to come back to your website, so if might say something like “for more great tools and tips about how to ________, visit us at: (YOURWEBSITE.com).

      Important: make your stinger slide show for only about 4 seconds before your video clip starts, then after your video ends make that same stinger slide remain on the screen for at least 4 minutes.

      After your video, you want that stinger slide to keep showing for so long for 2 reasons:

      1st:  because most of your viewers will need a moment to type in the URL that you’re showing on your video.

      2nd: because, on average 36% of your viewers will not be watching your full video. They’ll play it, then get distracted and do something else, but after the sound stops, they’ll look back over at the video – at that point, you want your URL, phone number, etc to be easily visible for them so they can take action.

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  14. Josh L  

    This line: "so many people pass those tips around that we get nearly 18% of all of our new visitors coming from links within those daily tip emails" gave me a lightbulb moment.  My company does something similar, with sending tips out every other day.  Like Chris, ours is set up in advance using an autoresponder.  What hadn't occurred to me, until reading this, is that I should include a blurb telling people to go ahead and forward the email to a friend.  And of course, making sure that there is a way for those friends to subscribe to the emails themselves.

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  15. Nicholas W.  

    Some people are better at taking in video messages then the written word, so I think it's good that the book pointed that out. Personally, I found it easier to digest information on business tips when listening to something, rather than reading it. 

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    • Rhonda Patton  

      If you think about it, using video as part of a web promotion has the advantage of what I think of as three levels of communication working together simultaneously.  There is the visual graphic of the video, the verbal communication that is part of the video, and then the written word on the site where the video is included.  People process information differently, so by using a three-for-one approach, you are bound to connect with more people.  Until reading iLead, I wouldn't have thought of it this way.

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  16. BillSnr  

    As a guy who spent years priding myself in being 'old school' adjusting to the impact of technology on the business world has been a challenge. iLead has been my source of insight into this field, and by adopting the advice on podcasting I've seen sales growth we;; beyond our company projections.

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  17. C&J Industries  

    One of the business tips that I found fascinating in this book is how much video marketing can improve conversions.  A 41% higher conversion than print is a pretty compelling reason to start doing video.  I would like to know if the videos have to have a face in them or does the audio alone work for building trust?

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    • Chris Guerriero  

      Your goals should to be delivery valuable content, fast, and using the media which your audience is most comfortable with.

      If that media is video then the type of video that is going to convert best for your audience is the kind of video that your audience relates to best.

      And if you use video as part of your business growth plan, know that more visitors are viewing your website on mobile devices every day. These users read less than desktop users, so make your videos play properly for mobile users as well as desktop users.

      Master Drive is a great example of a company who uses face videos very effectively to not only grow their brand and pull in sales, but also to convey to their audience that their team is dedicated to helping their customers (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgTXKMB2Z8s).

      But to be successful with those kinds of videos, you need someone from your company who is comfortable on camera, and who looks decent on camera, and who your audience can relate to. If you don’t have access to anyone like that, then you can hire a spokesperson who fits that criteria.

      Your corporate video needs to have key ingredients that visually shows your message, in a clear format, with an enticing call to action. Other types of video that convert well are: animated videos, motion graphic videos, and whiteboard videos.

      Hope that helps 🙂

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  18. Agnes Williams (Bloom Flowers NYC)  

    The end of chapter two that talks about both involing your business in your community and getting yourself known as a leader because of that, is pretty ingenious in my opinion. It's positive marketing at its finest.  

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  19. Ginger B.  

    I like the idea of free gifts to attract business growth. Whatever it is you are in the business of doing, people like free incentives. It's just another form of marketing really.   

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    • Tabby Beamis  

      I own a boutique and we make simple jewelery pieces to give to people when they come into my store.  I always select something to give them that either matches what they've bought or what they're wearing and I present it like a gift.  It kind of creates a bond, and I have a lot of loyal customers who love that I pick out something special to give to them with each purchase.  It's so simple, but it works.

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  20. Pauline  

    The community involvement aspect is what piques my interest. It's only logical that your consumers are a part of the comminty your business is in, so getting involved with your community will get the community involved with you. And yes, it is an organic process as there is no real business model for interacting with people on a personal level.   

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    • Robert Caldwell, Hovnanian Homes  

      I do business in multiple large towns but always view everyone I meet as a potential customer, so I go out of my way to connect with people and chit-chat about everyday stuff.  I'm amazed at the insight I gain about tastes and preferences about home styles by doing this and our company uses what I learn in our marketing. I never thought of taking this to the level you described – this is a great takeaway for us!

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  21. Ben Minton  

    No matter how successful we get, we strive to do better. Having watched our company website stats show month in month out that many visitors spent literally seconds on the landing page before leaving altogether we felt really frustrated, and very concerned. The plan laid out in iLead gave us the insight we needed to make small changes that have showed a very positive outcome. Looking forward to doubling our efforts on this one tactics next quarter and seeing even more results!

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    • iBizCoach  

      If your traffic is hitting your landing page and bouncing, chances are you are not targeting properly.  See where the majority of the traffic is coming from through your stats and then go there and change up your advertising.

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  22. Bill F (OBEY clothing)  

    The credibility factor is what I pay attention to. The way a company does business, the quality of their products, and the way they treat their customers has always made an impact on how our company conducts business. The part of this business book where Guerriero focused on refunds and how to study other company's refund policies was my greatest take-away, and is what we're now implementing into our customer service dept. Keep up the great work!

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  23. Simon R.  

    The bit about the Johnson and Johnson Corporation was very interesting. I knew spreading your message was important, but I didn't know it could play such a vital role in busines growth.

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  24. Jeremy D  

    Sales growth today can be difficult with the current economy.  Companies that aren't on the ball with things like online branding and social media are starting to get left behind, because communities are fueling business growth.  Our company Facebook page gives us the opportunity to portray the vision and mission of the company, while offering support to our customers at the same time.

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    • VanDerLinn  

      That's a very valid point, especially with the latest changes to Facebook and the growing focus on it being the one stop local community news site. On the other hand the option for followers to basically hide your posts has made me look into paying to promote my page's content. We're hoping this keeps us ahead of the competition.

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      • Leah  

        Paying to promote your page helps you to reach new prospects, but doesn't help a lot to prevent current followers from hiding your posts.  If that's what is happening, ask yourself why.  Better yet, run a survey on your page and ask your followers why – then fix it. 

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        • Bill Welsh  

          I really like the idea of running surveys to ask followers what they think.  Maybe what you think you're communicating and getting across isn't really what people hear.  I mean, if you want to have a real market presence, good to know what's on the minds of followers so as to course correct as necessary.

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    • Gloria  

      We built a Facebook business page and appointed a team to work specifically with our social media campaign after hearing from our front-line customer service that customers were asking for our Facebook page.  This isn't something Chris came up with off the top of his head – ask your customers or better yet, listen to them.

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  25. John Legitta  

    To be perfectly honest, I was kind of taken aback about the part that said the written word is the most effective way to convey a message. I don't know why but I wasn't really expecting that. It's a true but evasive concept. People can and do say just about anything, but when you write something you typically put more thought into it so it's more concise and easy to understand.

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    • RSVP  

      I would actually disagree that text is the most effective way to convey a message and I didn't get the sense that Chris was saying that at all.  In fact, his excellent advice about video marketing proves he realizes that you need a mix of media to reach a broader audience.

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      • Chris Guerriero  

        Right.  We've found that the media used in marketing has a profound impact on your bottom line numbers, but choosing the right mix of media has to be linked to your audience.

        If your target audience (the people who are currently buying your product or your competitors similar products) are TV watchers, then put a big chunk of your marketing into placing your message in front of them on the TV shows that they are most likely to be watching.

        If your target audience are online surfers, then use online as your main tool – but be more specific than just that!  These days it’s easy to find out if a target market likes to read short blurbs online, read long articles, look at pictures, view videos, listen to audios or podcasts, etc, etc, etc. In fact, within a few minutes, we can see if your prospective buyers are the kinds of people who click online advertisements or not…

        Just imagine a company who invests thousands ever month in Pay Per Click ads, but their particular audience is not the kind of prospects who click on those kinds of ads too often!!! What a waste of money.

        That happens all the time, because most companies are wrongfully ‘sold’ on the idea that they need to run PPC ads to get more traffic to their websites, when in fact, more “traffic” is not what you want. Whether you’re building a brand, growing your exposure, or just plain driving people to your website to make lots of sales – your focus should be on driving TARGETED visits to your website, because those visitors are at least 80% more likely to buy from you.

        All things equal… a website that gets 10,000 general visitors a day from paid online ads couldn’t even compete with a website that gets 100 TARGETED visitors a day (people who know about you, and are coming to your website because they want more from you).

        The right mix of media is a game changer for most companies. It allows small companies to compete with industry giants, and large companies to grow brands almost overnight.

        Check out: http://AdvancedBusinessGrowth.com/ibranding

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  26. Jane Bryants  

    Concerning the section on customer trust, it might be a good idea also if businesses either get or remain active in the communities they do business in. This goes hand in hand with reputation management as it's hard for a business to be reputable if they're not an active part in their own community.

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    • Brian Jamison  

      Participating in the community is an effective way to give back and support that community, but chances are if you don't spread the word, very few people will know of it.  That's why social media and press releases are so crucial to creating that buzz that Chris discusses in iLead.

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  27. Zack Stanton  

    If more businesses started putting customer trust at the head of their marketing tactics as the book suggests, we would be seeing more business growth in unexpected ways. For example we would start seeing more businesses succeed that put quality products ahead of company profits. 

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  28. Paul Miller  

    I'm using the STEP process described in the book, as despite being what I consider successful in business I think being an author of an industry accepted white-paper will definitely boost my credibility as well as my company's credibility (and my ego:)

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    • Cecile Madison  

      It's amazing what publishing will do for your credibility, particularly if it's print publishing.  The psychological perception is that only very smart people get published and even though most people are aware of self-publishing today, there is still that perception coloring things. 

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      • Richard N  

        I agree that publishing a book or white paper is tremendously effective at increasing credibility, but I don't think this is something that every company can do well.  I think it depends on what the company markets.

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  29. Sadiq  

    My brother gave me this book and I just started reading it. Right now I'm learning about using video to improve sales. It's interesting and I hope to learn enough to make me rich!

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  30. Helena  

    As a small business owner I strongly recommend this book. The contents are inspiring to anyone looking for business tips. In this economic climate we need to stay fresh and positive.

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    • Sherry H.  

      I am also a small business owner.  As most small business owners know, there is never enough time in the day.  The concepts in this book are so sensible and so well-presented that I know I will be able to effectively apply them in no time—and start reaping the benefits quickly as well.  Thanks for writing this book!

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  31. Dougie  

    Chapter 3 really hit home for me and I love the term "internal lateral expansion".  The concept is something I need to truly explore for continued business growth.  I tend to forget that the momentum created by setting up tools can become a beast in its own right.

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  32. Striving4success  

    I recommend anyone who has not finished reading iLead to look out for the story of Mary. I am guilty of having misunderstood the power of such people, a mistake I won't make again.

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    • Callie  

      The story of Mary really resonated with me, as well.  I shared that story with a business mastermind group that I meet with one a month.  In the past, I was appalled by how many people were culling their lists of anyone who hadn't purchased within a certain amount of time – often only 3-6 months!  I figure if someone is on our email list, it's because they like us and want to hear from us.  They can be on there forever, as far as I'm concerned.

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  33. Shaker  

    My COO recommended I read iLead to get a few new business concepts. Our company is the third largest in our industry so I was a bit skeptical that I would find anything valuable in a non-industry specific book. But Chris did an excellent job at detailing strategic (but simple) systems starting on the first page. The strategies in this book helped us easily hit our quarterly numbers.

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    • Cory Gates  

      Core marketing principles apply to every business, whether online or off, and no matter what the industry.  These core principles under-lay all the exciting marketing strategies that Chris details in iLead, which is what makes them so very powerful.

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  34. HeidiK  

    I guess the top tactic I got from iLead was the concept of working with a virtual team. I had heard the term virtual assistants use on the internet but never considered it for my "offline" business. I have two jewelry stores, and my staff just cannot take the time away from our in-store work to do online stuff, so I'm excited to hire my first online independent contractor and see what kind of results we get!

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    • Edward Jensen  

      I wish Chris Guerriero would write his next book on hiring independent contractors and freelancers.  It seems like it would be a big headache to manage, plus I worry about allowing outsiders into my business.

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    • Susan Plait  

      I'm more than happy to see that iLead recognizes and promotes the use of freelancers for Internet marketing purposes. That's because this is my business area, and I'm already see-ing a knock on effect as people come looking for quality 'virtual' employees.

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    • Linda P Lesser  

      I have recently started working as virtual administrative assistant to a local verterinarian in town.  He's been in business for two years.  He needs admin help but can't afford the overhead.  It's been working out well, because he can approach filling his needs flexibly, and of course, I love it.  Can't wait to read the section you refer to.

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    • Lucy Leu  

      I have been using a virtual admin assistant for a couple of months now. As a new Veterinarian in my town, I need the help but can't afford a lot of overhead.  I don't have to worry about the expense of setting up a work station also. Love that you cover this kind of topic in your book! Keep it coming…

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  35. Randy T  

    You know, Chris, you could easily expand just the iBecome appendix to create an entire study course on the art of writing a book and building credibility.  The entire iLead book is awesome, but that section alone is dynamite.

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  36. All Natural  

    When you discuss article arbitrage, the information is excellent.  However, that's not describing article arbitrage but article syndication.  Syndication can be a phenomenal way to create buzz, expand your market reach and reach laser-targeted prospects.

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    • Corinne32  

      You say pot-ay-to, Chris says po-tah-to.  Arbitrage or syndication, the concept is brilliantly detailed in the book and is something that every business owner should be considering and then using. 

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  37. bronson  

    In Chapter 4 when you discuss the four ways of creating buzz, you talk about having a big claim.  How do you come up with a big claim that doesn't sound like hype if you are marketing basic products that everyone needs?

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  38. luckylou  

    Brilliant work, as usual, Chris.  You managed to pack a huge number of business tips into what is actually quite a short book.  iLead is a keeper and one that I'll read over and over, discovering a new nuance every time I do.

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    • skreech  

      It definitely is a keeper but I highly recommend you printing it out and putting it in a folder or binder.  As you re-read it, make notes as you go because I guarantee you'll come up with a ton of ideas to help utilize these techniques to fuel your own business growth.

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      • Harvey Gorman  

        I had my assistant print copies of your chapter on Social Seeding for my management team. Having each of them read the chapter and bring 3 ideas each to Monday's team meeting on how they can implement that concept in their department!

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      • Laurie Couch  

        I do a lot of business travel and fly a lot. Lately I’ve been carrying a copy of iLead with me to study. So far I’ve learned a ton by comparing the concepts Chris has presented with what I observe while I’m out and about, and my marketing department is continually amazed by how fine-tuned my marketing suggestions have become. Thanks, Chris!

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  39. Kyle Williams  

    I'm liking the part about credibility and reputation management. I think these are very important in this day age as trust seems to be a vital issue among consumers.

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    • Ben Summers  

      Credibility has always been important in business, but in the day and age of social media and instant communications, reputation management is more critical than ever.  The idea that "credibilty sells" really comes through in the book and made me look at some things differently.

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  40. Cray  

    Something that I found particularly useful in this book was the advice to use the correct bait to attract pre-sold customers when you offer free gifts. I have a lot to learn, for sure.

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    • Janice  

      The key to knowing the correct bait is to know your target market.  That is the very first thing that a business needs to figure out before developing any marketing plan, so that they can take into account what their target market likes, wants and needs.

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      • James  

        Yes! In a market where people are bombarded with offers you need to stand out. It's definitely better to take the time to research the one thing which will add real value to your target market. Sometimes less really is more.

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    • Sunitta  

      What do you think about the idea of cross promoting? Although I have a strong business the responsibility to maintain my market position is ever present. I think that getting together with quality people running non-competitive businesses is extremely useful.

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  41. Jill Brinton  

    I would love to meet Chris Guerriero in person so I can say a major thank you for writing this book! I spent several years watching other people getting on in life, but couldn't see what I was lacking in comparison. Reading about the importance of credibility was the break through for me. Simply amazing.

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    • James Crandall (Publix)  

      I haven't actually met Chris Guerriero to speak to, but I have heard him give a presentation that would blow your socks off.  I no longer work for the company that sponsored that particular seminar so I won't say which one it was, but believe me when I say that it was stupendous and eye-opening for attendees.

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  42. Debra  

    I expect that our company is going to save at least 5 figures on our marketing budget over the next few months, thanks to iLead and you, Chris.  I can't believe that the simple concept of "The Same Content on Different Media" from Chapter 5 is one that had escaped our advertising crew!

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    • K Matthews  

      We've been doing that in a limited way, but iLead has opened my eyes about how many more ways we could be repurposing company content.  Currently, we always reuse our press releases on the company blog, but we could definitely be expanding on this.

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  43. Joe B.  

    Crdibility is something that is often overlooked. Or at the very least, left unspoken . Credibility breeds repect and it's one of those things that constantly needs to be fine-honed. 

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    • Connor Stevens  

      Credibility is vital in this day and age.  Consumers are rebelling against what they perceive as big business being out of touch and marketing gimmicks that mislead and hype, rather than explain. 

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  44. Walt M.  

    To Alex: You're right. And this is turn can lend more credibility to both the managers and the leaders. Not to metion the company itself. Recognizing the difference in skill sets can also be called reputation management.  

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  45. Rhonda G  

    ILead is an incredible book and I have to thank Chris for putting it out there.  I found the iBecome appendix to be wonderful at simplifying a process I thought would be difficult.  The concept of "Talk and Transcribe" is brilliant and I'd like to point out that there is software to make this easier called Dragon Naturally Speaking.  It's a voice recognition software that will do the typing for you, as you speak.

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  46. Ben  

    I've known for a long time that Chris Guerriero is someone to listen to, but he's outdone himself with iLead.  Reading Chapter 2 last night, I found myself nodding frequently as I agreed with the text.  Business growth is being fueled by social media and community building today and companies have to take advantage of this trend to stay on top.

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    • Aaron W - Wong Publishing  

      When our company became active in social media last year, our customer retention increased and calls in to our self-publishing department quadrupled.  I wholeheartedly agree with Chris on using social media effectively.

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  47. William B.  

    I'm agreeing with Jordan here. Thinking outside the box is a very effective way to get things done. You can expand on an existing idea well by following a lead, but that's only going to take your business growth only so far. Eventually you're going to have to step out of that comfort zone though and get something fresh in the works. 

    This has been my experience working in retail.

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    • Sammie  

      Excellent point, William.  I believe that staying in one's comfort zone keeps you in that box.  In fact, if you don't stretch yourself outside of that comfort zone, I would say that you stagnate and may even go backward.

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    • Terence Lim  

      I'm working in the retail field too, and it's both exciting and frustrating to have to keep one step ahead of the competition. One thing this book has taught me is that it's better to be the leader than the follower!

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  48. Jordan West  

    I'm just now starting this book and so far I'm liking what I see. Positioning your way to the top by doing things a bit out of the norm makes a lot of sense to me. I'm one who believes that business growth starts at the top with ingenuity and the guts to implement fresh ideas. Good work.  

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    • Able Martinez  

      But those fresh ideas should be somewhat connected to the tactics previously used by competitiors, no? In other words if one angle has gotten stale you should maybe use a marketing tactic that falls in line with something new that the company is doing. During football season for example, to say something like "Passing the savings onto you." This implies the company is doing well and you, the customer, will too if you do business with them. Just a thought. This is a great book and gets you thinking in todays customer mindset.

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      • Zane  

        There is no hard and fast rule that new tactics should tie in to the competition, Able.  In fact, that can be a hindrance.  You want your company to be unique and distinct from the competition.  I think that's the point Chris is making with iLead.

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        • Stat  

          At the end of the day I care about being the person recognized for setting the trends that others follow. Reputation management is the key to success in a popular field, and a vital component in my business philosophy.

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  49. Jack Anderson  

    I agree that management skills and leadership skills are different, but I see leadership as a stronger role. It's typically more proctive and hands-on whereas managing is simply that. It's more "white collar" and hands off. Leading people typically takes the form of doing for the sake of teaching, and I personally believe you can get better results, better productivity, by going that route.

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    • Able Martinez  

      Leadership skills are more important I think. Management is important as well, but when it comes to being proactive, you need a good leader to take charge of things.

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      • NC Business  

        Management is important in that it entails the responsibility to sometimes tell employees that the popular choice is not the correct one.  Leadership on the other hand requires teaching the employees why this is the case.

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      • David Cotter  

        I disagree.  I believe both leadership skills and management skills go hand-in-hand and are of equal importance.  A good CEO is going to have both skillsets, or at least, some qualities of each one.

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        • CWhite  

          While I agree that both are important, you will get a lot more productivity from a group that sees a leader who is willling to demonstrate. This shows that he or she is committed to the plan not just implementing mandates.

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  50. Ryan Lunden  

    I found this book valuable as it was based on research from several industries, not just one person's personal experience. As a CEO, the truth you shared about what Social Media really is all about helped me step back and identify what type of brand we am creating for our company — or failing to create. Reading the book has led to some very open discussions with my direct reports on those issues. I especially liked the process map that turns a brief look at past performance into a discussion about what the person needs to do to move forward.

    In our marketing, we often focused primarily on spreading news about our company. The author gave a different perspective on leveraging new ways to create what he calls a "Buzz" around both our strong and weak area's which has made a big positive impact on our AD ROI this year.

    I also liked the definition of "manager" vs. "leader". Too often management skills are seen as inferior to leadership, yet this book showed that they are separate skill sets. I've got a ways to go with both skill sets, but now have somewhat of a blueprint for how to move forward. This book has helped me look at what I am doing to grow our company, our brand and our customer base.

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    • Chuck Roberts  

      I agree with what you said about the social media aspect of it all. Real leadership is needed here to take the bull by the horns so substantial business growth can happen.

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    • Alex Rider  

      Ryan, I complete agree that leadership skills and management skills are two different skillsets.  Naturally, there should be at least a degree of overlap, at least at the very top levels of a company.  Recognizing the difference can really help a company organize their workforce more effectively.

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      • Topdog  

        Exactly. Recognizing which of your staff shine in which role is crucial. Some people assume they automatically go together, which is a recipe for disaster if you are looking towards business growth.

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        • TopDog  

          This should certainly be a management skill that both leaders and managers should have.  The ability to see who to put together in order that all people involved complement each other and make the team stronger is vital.

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        • Prism  

          The debate over management vs leadership skills is interesting to me. When I started my business I looked for people who had both qualities, but these days I could never justify such a decision. I employ some top class people behind the scenes, and they make excellent decisions about finances but would be lost leading even one person on the front line.

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    • Sarah Peters  

      I agree, Ryan – this book really is full of valuable information.  I am picking up a copy for everyone on my management team and requiring them to read it.  We will be discussing the ideas raised at our next staff meeting.

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      • R.J. Sawtelle  

        That's a very good idea.  I think I'll require my executive and management teams to read this, as well.  If we discuss the ideas, I believe it will sink in better plus my team is likely to come up with even better tactics than if I just told them to do things.

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  51. Colleen Barry  

    I own two companies in the housing industry. We had been focusing most of our ad dollars on radio in the past with marginal results (breakeven or slightly better on average). The centerpiece of our marketing strategy has now become internet videos (which we also use at our trade shows) after learning in iLead about how effective this approach is. These short videos are easier, more effective and far less expensive to create and manage. Great concept!

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